When it comes to standardized tests in elementary school, parents often worry more than students about the results. To build parents’ confidence about testing and help students do their best, inform families about:

  • How tests work. Parents often feel “in the dark” about standardized tests. Address common questions, such as: What tests will my child take during elementary school? What subjects do they cover? Why are these tests given? What kinds of questions do they ask? How are students prepared? What do the scores mean?
  • When tests are scheduled. Give parents plenty of notice so they can avoid making appointments or planning vacations on test days.
  • How to support children. Parents can make sure their kids keep up with schoolwork, review key topics at home, maintain consistent sleep routines, and stay upbeat and relaxed about testing. Publicize any extra help that is available for parents of struggling students.

 

Involve families to celebrate the 100th day of school

Most schools reach the 100th day of school around the end of January or beginning of February. Here are four ways to help students, staff and parents celebrate this big day:

  1. Encourage students to make and wear shirts that have 100 items on them. This is a fun family activity. They can use fabric markers to draw on shirts, or attach items like safety pins, googly eyes, etc.
  2. Have students make predictions about what life will be like 100 years from now. Have them ask their parents to make predictions, too.
  3. Challenge students and parents to make top-100 lists. They can write down 100 reasons why they like school, 100 things they’ve learned this year or 100 things they would like to accomplish.
  4. Host a reading contest. Who can read the most books in the next 100 days?

 

Quote of the Day

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“Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.”

Herman Cain

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