Studies show that many students suffer from summer learning loss. And this year’s losses may be even greater due to COVID-19 school closures. Start thinking about ways to partner with parents to help students retain what they have learned this year. Here are three strategies:

  1. Define it. Most parents might not know what the term “summer slide” means. Explain in general terms that children will lose some of their school skills if they don’t use them.
  2. Defeat it. Give parents ways they can work with their children. Make a list of “summer slide stoppers.” Suggest that parents read with their child for 15 minutes every day. Recommend summer online classes or virtual field trips. Share ideas for on-the-spot learning, such as measuring ingredients for a recipe.
  3. Distribute it. Share tips for preventing summer slide to parents as soon as possible. Send home notices, post summer learning ideas on your school website, run an ad in the local newspaper or try to get a spot on a local radio or cable TV station.

 

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Include college and career readiness information on your website

Studies show that parent involvement in post-secondary planning makes a student’s successful transition to college and a career more likely. Make sure your school website provides families with the information they need to navigate the process. This is especially important now that face-to-face meetings are impossible due to school closures. On your school website, include:

  • Links to resources such as the FAFSA, The College Board and the ACT websites.
  • College and career readiness articles and strategies.
  • Important details about college entrance exam dates and registration deadlines. Include your district’s high school graduation requirements.

did-you-know  Did You Know?

According to a recent nationwide survey, 78% of parents of K-12 students are satisfied with the communication from their children’s school during the COVID-19 shutdowns and 87% have at least one child who is engaging in learning activities from their school. However, nearly 25% of parents worry that their children may be ill-prepared for the upcoming school year.

Understanding Coronavirus in America Study, USC Dornsife Center for Economic and Social Research.

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