Parent-child relationships play a powerful role in children's learning and development—which is why it’s beneficial to share parenting information with families. One study by the Search Institute identified five actions parents can take to strengthen their children’s perseverance, conscientiousness, self-control and ability to work with others. Encourage parents to:

  1. Show an interest in what their children are learning and doing. Let their children know they will always be there for them.
  2. Set high expectations for their children. Help their children set goals and strive for improvement.
  3. Provide support. Help their children complete tasks and achieve goals.
  4. Share power. Listen to their children’s ideas and concerns and let them participate in making family decisions.
  5. Expand possibility. Broaden their children’s horizons and introduce them to new people and experiences. 
photo of a father and child

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Working with immigrant families

Newly immigrated students often need special help in making a successful transition to their new school. Here are things to consider when working with immigrant students and their families:

  • Students may be homesick for their friends, language and customs.
  • Parents may have substantial formal education in their native language but little skill in English. Avoid educational jargon and consider using interpreters in meetings with parents not fluent in English.
  • Economic survival is often the primary concern for immigrant families.
  • Immigrant students and their parents can be rewarding to work with if you take the time to learn about their needs, backgrounds and strengths.

did-you-know  Did You Know?

According to a USA Today/Ipsos poll, one in five teachers say they are unlikely to return to the classroom if schools reopen this fall. Eighty-three percent of the surveyed teachers say they are facing challenges teaching students, and two-thirds say they are working more than they did before the COVID-19 pandemic. In a separate poll of K-12 parents, 6 in 10 say they would be likely to pursue at-home learning options instead of sending their children back to school this fall. Thirty percent of parents say they are "very likely" to do that.

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