Talking to kids about COVID-19 is easier if you follow the tips below. Share these strategies with families and teachers:

  • Speak calmly. Your calmness will help children be calm.
  • Share the facts but leave out unnecessary details that may increase anxiety. Find reliable information about preventing COVID-19 at the Centers for Disease Control's website at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/prevention.html.
  • Validate feelings. Some children may be afraid or worried. Some may be disappointed about missing cancelled activities. Say that it is OK to feel that way.
  • Offer reassurance. Let kids know that you will cope with this together.
  • Empower kids. Help them feel a sense of control. Explain that by following instructions, like washing hands thoroughly, they can keep themselves and others safe.

 

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Five habits for success

Want to become a more effective leader? Here are five habits you can start practicing today:

  1. Get enough sleep. Aim for at least eight hours of sleep each night.
  2. Eat a healthy breakfast. Your body and mind need fuel to function properly.
  3. Replace social media with learning time. Listen to a podcast. Read a book.
  4. Surround yourself with people who will help you grow. Find mentors and learn from them.
  5. Make time for daily exercise. Talk a walk. Shoot some hoops with your kids.

did-you-know  Did You Know?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website is full of reliable information, resources and updates on COVID-19. Visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

Source goes here

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

 

   

While educators are focused on facilitating remote learning for students, don’t forget about parents! Empower them to support their students at home by sharing information in new ways, such as:

  • An audio recording that parents can listen to.
  • A video that parents can watch on a smartphone, tablet or computer.
  • A collection of articles that parents can download from your school’s website or social media site.

 

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Team up with parents to reduce recreational screen time

As more schools close and move to online learning, reducing screen time can become an even greater challenge for parents. Share information with families on the importance of reducing recreational screen time and encourage them to:

  • Set limits on recreational screen time.
  • Monitor children’s digital activity.
  • Remove televisions, computers and other digital devices from children’s rooms.
  • Establish screen-free times, such as during meals and family time.
  • Enforce a technology curfew. All screens should be turned off at least one hour before bedtime.

did-you-know  Did You Know?

According to a study published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, children who spend fewer than two hours a day using digital devices in their free time perform better on cognitive tests that assess their thinking, language and memory.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

 

   

During times of crisis, it’s important to be aware of your school district’s policy regarding media inquiries. If your administration/staff are not authorized to respond to media inquiries, make sure they know to direct callers to your district’s official spokesperson.

If there is someone at your school who is authorized to talk to media, make sure that person has talking points that have been agreed upon by leadership before they speak publicly on behalf of the school. In addition, share these tips:

  • Stick to the facts. Don’t speculate. If you don’t know the answer to a question, admit it, offer to get back to the reporter—and then do so.
  • Stop talking when you have finished answering a question. Reporters often wait in silence for more information—don’t feel compelled to keep talking.
  • Realize that reporters are looking for a clear, quotable statement. If you are asked a question that is off the point, redirect the interview by answering the question you wish you had been asked. Say something like, “What’s important here is that ... ,” to get everyone back on track.

 

Defuse angry parents

Sometimes parents get angry—especially in times of crisis. It’s critical that school staff handle it effectively. Here are some tips for dealing with parents who are angry, frustrated or stressed out:

  • Listen. Parents need to be heard. Simply paying attention and restating what you hear can put parents at ease.
  • Empathize. Don’t take the anger personally. Instead, focus on the goal you share: their student’s well-being.
  • Remain calm. Model behavior you want to see—a composed, respectful demeanor.
  • Set clear ground rules. If a parent swears at you, you don’t have to take it. Say as quietly as you can that you don’t respond to foul language, and that if it continues, you’ll have to meet at another time.

 

Quote of the Day

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

“One of the most sincere forms of respect is actually listening to what another has to say.”

Bryant H. McGill

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Schools across the country are closing to slow the spread of the coronavirus. If your school is still open, here are four things you need to know:

  1. Most children aren’t showing symptoms. To date, the virus is having a more severe impact on older adults and people with a history of respiratory infections.
  2. Students who are sick should not come to school. Remind families to keep children home from school if they have a fever.
  3. Prevention is key. Encourage staff and students to wash their hands regularly throughout the school day. Handwashing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds is the most effective way to minimize the threat of contracting the virus.
  4. The Center for Disease Control has developed a fact sheet to explain COVID-19 and the steps people can take to protect themselves. Share it with your students, families and staff. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/2019-ncov-factsheet.pdf

 

Support students and families during transition to remote learning

As schools across the nation shift to remote learning, educators, students and families are faced with significant challenges. To ease the transition, remember that:

  • Not all families have access to computers and high-speed internet. If possible, provide tablets and hotspots to students who are in need.
  • Parents will have to assist younger students with online learning. Young children will need help logging into an app, reading instructions, staying on task, etc. Teachers should keep this in mind as they prepare lessons.
  • Families rely on schools for more than learning. Schools provide students with free or affordable meals, counseling and after-school activities. When school is out, families often struggle to find childcare. Work with your community to support students and their families during the tradition to remote learning.

 

Quote of the Day

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

“You can’t lead the people if you don’t love the people. You can’t save the people if you don’t serve the people.”

Cornel West

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

When teachers connect directly with parents and help them become engaged in their children’s math education, everyone wins. Encourage teachers to:

  • Summarize the math concepts students are learning. Use family-friendly language and include practical examples.
  • Inform parents that current math content and instruction will look different from the math they had in school.
  • Share math resources, such as websites and apps, that parents can explore with their children.
  • Provide ideas about how parents can support their children with math homework.
  • Remind parents that they are not expected to be the teacher and reteach or explain concepts.
  • Encourage parents to contact them with questions and concerns. Communication is key!

 

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Don’t forget to thank volunteers!

Most schools have a group of dedicated parent volunteers. And sometimes, in the rush of things, those volunteers can be taken for granted. Make sure you don’t forget to thank your reliable workers. Here are a few simple ways to show your appreciation:

  • Have a special column in your school newsletter that is dedicated to recognizing volunteers.
  • Post messages of thanks on your school’s social media platforms.
  • Create a wall of fame display with photos of volunteers helping with school events and activities.

did-you-know  Did You Know?

A new study published in the Journal of School Psychology found that 94% of middle school teachers experience high levels of stress, which could contribute to negative outcomes for students. Researchers agree that reducing the burden of teaching is critical to improving student success—both academically and behaviorally.

K.C. Herman and others, “Profiles of middle school teacher stress and coping: Concurrent and prospective correlates,” Journal of School Psychology.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

 

   

Search

Go to Top
JSN Solid 2 is designed by JoomlaShine.com | powered by JSN Sun Framework